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Lou Gehrig's disease aka ALS

In my recent post on Scurvy I referenced this story regarding eating eel and developing scurvy:

The Crusades, however, provide an example of one written account of scurvy during the 13th century.[133] During Lent, when soldiers abstained from meat (except eel) and restricted their diets, a scurvy epidemic likely unfolded as “the barber surgeons were forced to cut away the dead flesh from the gums to enable the people to masticate their food.”[134] However, it is noted that the Crusaders believed that the disease was caused by eating eel which supposedly ate the dead.[135]

Mark responded to this with the following very interesting article from 1929 of Lou Gehrig's habit of regularly eating eel.

“…and Mrs. Gehrig, if she is around, laughs as though to reprove him, nodding her head up and down. She is continually cooking for him, making apple-cake, and cookies with raisins and pieces of bright red suet in them, making roasts, and frying the fish and eels he catches in the Sound. Lou goes fishing for eels so often that sometimes there are too many to eat; then Mrs. Gehrig pickles them. There is a superstitious belief among the Yankees that eating pickled eels at the Gehrigs’ will make you hit the ball; if any member of the team is batting badly he tries to get Lou to ask him up to dinner. Even the largest parties at suppertime do not annoy Mrs. Gehrig.
“There is enough for everybody,” she says, counting the heads, and pushing chairs up to the table.
“Why should Lou eat eels?” some ballplayer remarks later, wiping his mouth. “He always hits good, doesn’t he, Mr. Gehrig?”

ALS…yet another manifestation of retinoid poisoning?

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1929/08/10/the-little-heinie

 

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JennyOuraniakathy55woodДаниилArminRudijethroYuri

There's some interesting epidemiology around ALS itself. First of all, it's surprising that ALS occurs more often in men rather than women:

Men have a higher risk of ALS than women, leading to a male-to-female ratio of 1.2–1.5

It's not a big difference, but the opposite pattern is more usual.

Geographically, ALS is actually more prevalent in some very specific places in pacific Asia:

Geographic foci of the Western Pacific form of ALS, mainly in Guam and the Kii Peninsula of Honshu Island, Japan, have been reported, with a prevalence 50–100 times higher than in other parts of the world

 Certainly not the usual suspects we are accustomed to seeing in autoimmune disease. Would be interesting to see the dietary staples in these places.

[1] https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4334292/#!po=2.14286

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ggenereuxOuraniakathy55woodДаниил

Hi @rudi,

Yeah, I’ve seen some other researchers report that there’s a correlation between higher rates of ALS and coastal regions with a lot of algae/  seasonal algae blooms. Algae is quite high in carotenoids, and I think this is why some fish end up being high in vA too.

So, people in these coastal regions may not be necessarily eating eel, but they’re probably regularly eating the local fish.

 

From the 1921 article about Lou Gehrig it is also a mentioned bright red suet (fat from animals), the word root is sebum.

I don't know what Gehrig's wife might have used to make the suet bright red.

Looking up suet I saw that it can be a precursor to tallow, rendering suet can become tallow.

But real suet should just be kidney fat from beef or lamb at least from what I read in these two articles:

"Real suet is located on the inside of loin area of cattle and sheep. It is the hard fat that surrounds the animal’s kidneys. If you ask your butcher for suet, be sure he or she understands that you want kidney fat."

Suet, Part two: What it is, What it isn’t, and What to Look For

"Suet is the crumbly, hard, and saturated fat found around animal kidneys."

"https://discover.grasslandbeef.com/blog/what-is-suet/"

Mrs. Gehrig made pies with suet as said in the quote from the 1929 article and she probably also used it in other parts of her cooking. Using suet seems to have been quite common 100 years ago.

 

My friend's mom died of this disease recently.  I was talking with a family member and didn't want to press too hard.   I wondered if she ever had headaches (it was such a big thing for me).  I was told that, strangely enough, no.    I went to the funeral and was so amazed at her pretty, clear facial skin.  (unlike my own).   I suppose you could say that she was a bit overweight--as many are.  From what I can gather, the first symptom was a loss of ability to speak.    I'm not saying she didn't have VA toxicity, or some sort of other toxicity.  Just that I'm always on the prowl for VA symptoms and they weren't jumping out at me.

@ggenereux2014

Given how much you attribute retinoids/VA to the causing of disease, and how long you've been avoiding VA - how much of a part do you intuit VA plays in the aging process itself?

Hi @kurtis,

Although I do believe that vA toxicity is responsible for a wide range of disease conditions, I don’t believe that it is the only factor. There are many other environmental, food, so-called medicines, and lifestyle factors that are also significant contributors.

I do believe that vA does significantly accelerate the aging process.  It does this by driving up the replication rate of stem cells, and at the same times it is causing malformed proteins to be produced throughout the body. Eventually, the stem cell population is depleted where it is no longer able to properly maintain the tissue.

Consider what's wrong with this photo of Alois Alzheimer's patient Auguste Deter in 1902? Hers was the first described case of what became known as Alzheimer's disease.

Auguste D aus Marktbreit.jpg

In this photo she is less than 55 yo.

Grant

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lil chickrDavidkathy55wood
Quote from ggenereux on September 22, 2021, 10:45 am

In my recent post on Scurvy I referenced this story regarding eating eel and developing scurvy:

The Crusades, however, provide an example of one written account of scurvy during the 13th century.[133] During Lent, when soldiers abstained from meat (except eel) and restricted their diets, a scurvy epidemic likely unfolded as “the barber surgeons were forced to cut away the dead flesh from the gums to enable the people to masticate their food.”[134] However, it is noted that the Crusaders believed that the disease was caused by eating eel which supposedly ate the dead.[135]

Mark responded to this with the following very interesting article from 1929 of Lou Gehrig's habit of regularly eating eel.

“…and Mrs. Gehrig, if she is around, laughs as though to reprove him, nodding her head up and down. She is continually cooking for him, making apple-cake, and cookies with raisins and pieces of bright red suet in them, making roasts, and frying the fish and eels he catches in the Sound. Lou goes fishing for eels so often that sometimes there are too many to eat; then Mrs. Gehrig pickles them. There is a superstitious belief among the Yankees that eating pickled eels at the Gehrigs’ will make you hit the ball; if any member of the team is batting badly he tries to get Lou to ask him up to dinner. Even the largest parties at suppertime do not annoy Mrs. Gehrig.
“There is enough for everybody,” she says, counting the heads, and pushing chairs up to the table.
“Why should Lou eat eels?” some ballplayer remarks later, wiping his mouth. “He always hits good, doesn’t he, Mr. Gehrig?”

ALS…yet another manifestation of retinoid poisoning?

https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/1929/08/10/the-little-heinie

 

my gums bleed as I brush my teeth, thats a sign of me having lack of vitamin C because vitamin A has sucked in all of the stored C. 
I usually take Vitamin C for a week and it goes away . 

over the period of last 2 years , low vitamin A diet has reduced my need for often dosing with vitamin C . Its a good sign 

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Jennykathy55wood