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Reducing Neuroinflammation with Nutrients

ETA: Changed the post name from “Repairing White Matter of the Brain” to the current title, because this describes the root cause better I guess: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4805095/

February 2nd, 2019

Wanted to start a topic on this, because there’s evidence some of the illnesses we are dealing with here (Clinical Depression, Chronic Fatigue Syndrome, Parkinson’s, etc) could be involve white matter loss, which is not (as had been thought) a “normal” part of aging. Here is a video showing how mini strokes can cause damage to this area of the brain. Vitamin A toxicity might contribute to causing a stroke, right? Anyway, I have to get offline at this point, but I’ll try to post some more information about this if I find anything interesting or potentially helpful. Does anyone know anything about how white matter in the brain gets repaired?

February 13th, 2020

I want to update this post with more information about nutrients that may help reduce the neuroinflammation people are suffering from as a result of Vitamin A Toxicity. (Will continue to add to the list as I find things.)

Hopefully this can serve as a bit of an index towards other threads on these nutrients on the site as well.

 

Thiamin (vitamin B1)

High doses of Thiamin HCL were used to treat Parkinson’s Disease (and other neurodegenerative and autoimmune diseases) by Dr. Antonio Costantini in Italy. He explains his protocol here:

https://highdosethiamine.org/

Also from Dr. Costantini (a pilot study on Parkinson’s, and case study on Fibromyalgia, both treated with high dose thiamin):

 

Another excellent resource (an expert on it, actually) on thiamin is Dr. Derrick Lonsdale, who talks about refeeding syndrome and the paradox of feeling worse before you get better when starting thiamin:

 

Histamine levels and thiamin deficiency:

 

Riboflavin (vitamin B2)

Case study of an individual with CFS who recovered after taking B1 and B2:

People who have the MTHFR mutation may especially benefit from B2:

Riboflavin thread here:

https://ggenereux.blog/discussion/topic/riboflavins-role-in-an-important-va-detox-pathway/

 

Fiber (the enormous healing properties of beans)

Beans are good sources of thiamin and molybdenum.

Nutritionist and biochemist Karen Hurd stresses the importance of bean fibre when healing from disease:

Here is a testimonial from a client of Mrs. Hurd’s, who recovered from fibromyalgia (she explains the dietary interventions Mrs. Hurd recommended to her):

Beans reduce the bioavailability and absorption of Vitamin A in the digestive tract as well:

 

Biotin

May help heal myelin and is a promising treatment for MS:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/26327679-targeting-demyelination-and-virtual-hypoxia-with-high-dose-biotin-as-a-treatment-for-progressive-multiple-sclerosis/

Also, isotretinoin may lower biotinidase activity:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/10325581?fbclid=IwAR0u-Le4_dJ4JFgn7q9idUkHsZ5c0qvJKwyirdgBUooLql6WrsbmUxsqEEQ

A personal story from a woman with autism and CFS who improved her health using biotin:

https://www.syndromea.org/2018/10/29/autism-and-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

Researchers studying biotin for MS think it may affect brain function by increasing the capacity for neurons to make energy and by having a generally neuroprotective effect. Energy production is a known issue in ME/CFS and in autism. Biotin acts as a cofactor for processes that create ingredients for cellular energy production.  Biotin also promotes the production of myelin, the nerve insulator in MS whose loss causes the characteristic neurological problems.

Research has shown that a biotin deficiency results in overall higher levels of inflammation, possibly by promoting the activity of one of the central inflammatory proteins in the body: NF-κB. Perhaps extra high levels of biotin suppress this protein.

A Greek study examining potential metabolic disorders in a sample of kids with autism found that twelve of them had signs of biotin deficiency. Biotin deficiency in the absence of a specific genetic mutation is extremely uncommon because biotin is recycled in the body by an enzyme called biotinidase. A biotinidase enzyme genetic mutation will typically lead to chronic biotin deficiency from an early age because of an inability to recycle biotin. Biotinidase deficiency has been associated with autism in case studies of individual children.

However, none of the children showed in the Greek study showed a deficiency in the biotinidase enzyme itself. The researchers did not know the cause of the apparent deficiency. Seven of these twelve children responded positively to a high dose of biotin.  The amount researchers used was lower than the amount used in the MS studies. One child became completely free of autism and went back to school but relapsed when taken off biotin.

Ron Davis of the OMF foundation says that his son Whitney, who has a severe case of ME/CFS, has a rare sort of biotin deficiency.

I don’t know how many people with ME/CFS and/or autism would be positively affected by high dose biotin. I also don’t know if one of the other supplements and medications I was already taking allows biotin to work for me in the way that it does. But the difference in my quality of life is undeniable with biotin. Missing a dose brought back all of my symptoms in full force.

Biotin and thiamin can be lifesaving in Basal Ganglia Disease:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24812013-biotin-responsive-basal-ganglia-disease-neuroimaging-features-before-and-after-treatment/

 

Ubiquinol / Coenzyme Q-10

Helpful for cognitive function:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/27125909-ubiquinol-10-supplementation-improves-autonomic-nervous-function-and-cognitive-function-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome/

 

D-Ribose

This is being used to help patients with Fibromyalgia and Chronic Fatigue Syndrome:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/17109576-the-use-of-d-ribose-in-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-and-fibromyalgia-a-pilot-study/

This doctor also recommends it for heart patients:

https://heartmdinstitute.com/diet-nutrition/vitamins-supplements/d-ribose-what-it-is-and-why-every-heart-patient-needs-it/

 

Vitamin D

Can be low in some people with CFS and POTS:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21886073-iron-insufficiency-and-hypovitaminosis-d-in-adolescents-with-chronic-fatigue-and-orthostatic-intolerance/?from_term=Pots+vitamins&from_pos=8

 

Essential Fatty Acids (omega 6s and 3s)

This is worth a read—it talks about the importance of stable EFAs in the diet, and includes case studies of people who improved their conditions (schizophrenia, MS, Lyme Disease, CFS, Stroke, Autism, Muscular Dystrophy, and Epilepsy) with Essential Fatty Acids:

http://becknatmed.com/doc/BodyBioBulletin-4to1Oil.pdf.

 

B12 and the RnB Treatment Protocol

Orion shared the RnB Protocol, which shows the importance of minerals in regards to raising B vitamin levels.

https://b12oils.com/rnb.htm

Someone who improved their brain fog using this protocol:

https://forums.phoenixrising.me/threads/very-noticeable-improvements-in-brain-fog-using-dr-greg-russell-joness-transdermal-b12-oils-which-provide-a-similar-dose-to-b12-injections.75317/?fbclid=IwAR1Pe02ifojm-CNYoSxmcoVrwoJXsTEPXhCpmyT6GUXtSWt6tKo1zrZUXfQ

People who have POTS have low B12 compared to healthy controls:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/24366986-postural-orthostatic-tachycardia-syndrome-pots-and-vitamin-b12-deficiency-in-adolescents/?from_term=POTS+vitamin&from_pos=2

 

Iron

Almost 50% of people with with POTS and CFS have insufficient iron levels and stores:

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/21886073-iron-insufficiency-and-hypovitaminosis-d-in-adolescents-with-chronic-fatigue-and-orthostatic-intolerance/?from_term=Pots+vitamins&from_pos=8

 

Dr. Sarah Myhill’s CFS/ME Protocol

She addresses vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients that may be helpful for people with CFS/ME, as well as importance of pacing:

https://www.drmyhill.co.uk/wiki/Overview_of_CFS/ME_protocol

 

Lecithin/Choline

Here is a thread discussing this nutrient:

https://ggenereux.blog/discussion/topic/patent-therapy-for-retinoid-pathogenesis/

 

Flouride 

Quote from tim on January 5, 2020, 6:26 pm
In the book The Devils Poison: How Fluoride is Killing You the author has some good info on B Vitamins. Fluoride and other toxins interfere with B Vitamins. You can read the part on riboflavin on google books. It explains how riboflavin is needed to mobilize iron and that it is likely that it is needed to mobilize copper. It makes a lot of sense that riboflavin deficiency could be responsible for copper toxicity or non bioavailable copper.
 

In a recent blog post, Grant explains how vitamin A could contribute to causing strokes.

Inflammation harms the brain, too. Here are a couple of articles about new research connecting brain inflammation and ME/CFS:

 

Interview with Dr. Jarred Younger on Neuroinflammation

https://selfhacked.com/blog/dr-jared-younger-cutting-edge-research-on-cfs-neuroinflammation-pain-and-fatigue/

Dr. Jarred Younger thinks the way to correct the problem is to help to regulate the immune system (if it’s misfiring) and/or eliminate the virus or bacteria triggering it (Lyme’s Disease, Epstein Barr, etc). I didn’t grasp how vaccines containing vitamin A could cause injury and death (I remember Grant’s book explained that, because it was horrifying to read how many children had died because of those injections, but my brain fog was strong so the science went way over my head...), but could a similar bad interaction between the two be happening here as well?

“I think we need to think broader—let’s not demonize that one thing. It could be the influenza virus you had three years ago, it could be the Epstein Barr Virus you had a long time ago, it could be something we don’t even really think of. So, I do think, and we certainly know from the rodent models, that it’s possible for—like I said, these “immune hits,” especially if they’re severe or repeated too close together, or possibly if you get immunizations. I don’t want to get into the immunizations debate, but experimental immunizations may stress the immune system as well and could do that too. I think it’s definitely possible-some people are walking around, they had a major infection, and now they’re chronically experiencing the symptoms, like they have the flu, because the immune system is sensitized.

— Dr. Jarred Younger

 

Brain on Fire

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/09/24/brain-fire-neuroinflammation-found-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs/

Dr. Younger recently completed a study using thermometry as a way of measuring inflammation in the brain. He found that (unlike healthy controls, who had no inflammation at all) the brains of CFS patients had widespread inflammation.

“Younger found lactate – a product of anaerobic metabolism – widely distributed across the brains of people with ME/CFS. He opened a chart showing an amazing array of lactate-engorged brain regions. He picked out a few: the insula, hippocampus, thalamus, and putamen, which had particularly high levels. They were virtually the same regions the Japanese had found in their 2015 study. The fact that the temperature increases overlapped with the lactate increases provided further confidence that Younger had identified some key areas.

“The interior cingulate cortex, in particular, which Younger called “the seat of suffering” in the brain, showed up in spades. It’s associated with a lot of nasty symptoms (malaise, fatigue and pain) and it’s shown up in both ME/CFS and fibromyalgia studies in the past. The high choline signal in that region of the brain suggested that inflammation there was producing a pattern of destruction and replacement; i.e. quite a bit of damage – even possibly neuronal damage – was happening there.”

— Cort Johnson

 

So the brain needs choline to repair damage? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28788094 <— It looks like it also protects the brain. I wonder if phosphatidyl choline would be a good supplement for people with brain inflammation to take.

Also, what the heck are they doing here? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29138531 Retinoic Acid loaded nanoparticles? 😬

Hi @puddleduck

 

Have you ever tried to supplement with choline, if yes in which amounts?

I ordered some choline from thorne research and will look if it is helping me with my brain fog.

Thanks for the post

Hello, @sblumel  🙂

Several years ago when I had mental illness, a company called Truehope told me to take a tablet of choline whenever I had racing thoughts or was too wired. So basically, the dose could vary a lot! I don’t remember how many milligrams were in the tablets, probably between 200 and 500 mg. I liked the tablet form because you could let it dissolve in your mouth. The taste became associated with the nutrient, so if I ever craved that taste I would have some.

Choline was also in their multivitamin supplement (EMPower+, which I can’t recommend because it contains Vitamin A) so I was taking a baseline daily, but they don’t disclose the amount, unfortunately. Sorry I can’t be more helpful regarding the dosage.

Thorne has quality products! I hope the choline helps you. Brain fog is no fun. I’m sorry you’re dealing with that.

If you’re comfortable sharing, let us know how it goes.

Quote from puddleduck on February 14, 2019, 11:33 pm

In a recent blog post, Grant explains how vitamin A could contribute to causing strokes.

Inflammation harms the brain, too. Here are a couple of articles about new research connecting brain inflammation and ME/CFS:

 

Interview with Dr. Jarred Younger on Neuroinflammation

https://selfhacked.com/blog/dr-jared-younger-cutting-edge-research-on-cfs-neuroinflammation-pain-and-fatigue/

Dr. Jarred Younger thinks the way to correct the problem is to help to regulate the immune system (if it’s misfiring) and/or eliminate the virus or bacteria triggering it (Lyme’s Disease, Epstein Barr, etc). I didn’t grasp how vaccines containing vitamin A could cause injury and death (I remember Grant’s book explained that, because it was horrifying to read how many children had died because of those injections, but my brain fog was strong so the science went way over my head...), but could a similar bad interaction between the two be happening here as well?

“I think we need to think broader—let’s not demonize that one thing. It could be the influenza virus you had three years ago, it could be the Epstein Barr Virus you had a long time ago, it could be something we don’t even really think of. So, I do think, and we certainly know from the rodent models, that it’s possible for—like I said, these “immune hits,” especially if they’re severe or repeated too close together, or possibly if you get immunizations. I don’t want to get into the immunizations debate, but experimental immunizations may stress the immune system as well and could do that too. I think it’s definitely possible-some people are walking around, they had a major infection, and now they’re chronically experiencing the symptoms, like they have the flu, because the immune system is sensitized.

— Dr. Jarred Younger

 

Brain on Fire

https://www.healthrising.org/blog/2018/09/24/brain-fire-neuroinflammation-found-chronic-fatigue-syndrome-me-cfs/

Dr. Younger recently completed a study using thermometry as a way of measuring inflammation in the brain. He found that (unlike healthy controls, who had no inflammation at all) the brains of CFS patients had widespread inflammation.

“Younger found lactate – a product of anaerobic metabolism – widely distributed across the brains of people with ME/CFS. He opened a chart showing an amazing array of lactate-engorged brain regions. He picked out a few: the insula, hippocampus, thalamus, and putamen, which had particularly high levels. They were virtually the same regions the Japanese had found in their 2015 study. The fact that the temperature increases overlapped with the lactate increases provided further confidence that Younger had identified some key areas.

“The interior cingulate cortex, in particular, which Younger called “the seat of suffering” in the brain, showed up in spades. It’s associated with a lot of nasty symptoms (malaise, fatigue and pain) and it’s shown up in both ME/CFS and fibromyalgia studies in the past. The high choline signal in that region of the brain suggested that inflammation there was producing a pattern of destruction and replacement; i.e. quite a bit of damage – even possibly neuronal damage – was happening there.”

— Cort Johnson

 

So the brain needs choline to repair damage? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/28788094 <— It looks like it also protects the brain. I wonder if phosphatidyl choline would be a good supplement for people with brain inflammation to take.

Also, what the heck are they doing here? https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/29138531 Retinoic Acid loaded nanoparticles?

Here's my go-to on PC therapy.

Dr. Patricia Kane, PhD

Super interesting stuff @hillcountry ! Thank you! 😁 I thought I had replied way before to tell you that I enjoyed learning about Dr. Patricia Kane’s work. I bought some choline and flora’s sunflower oil as a result. I think it’s helpful for me, especially the sunflower oil (since I avoided PUFAs for several years).