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Testing Liver After 8 months on diet.

Quote from romaine on May 21, 2019, 3:32 pm
Quote from Janelle525 on May 21, 2019, 1:34 pm

Vitamin C does not cause oxalate kidney stones and is not a major source of increased oxalate in the body, coffee and chocolate in the diet would generate more oxalate than using vitamin C. It can increase excretion of it too. Damaged gut can cause people to absorb more oxalate. Antibiotics can cause this very easily by wiping out the bacteria that handles some of our oxalate load and increasing candida overgrowth.

 

Vitamin B6 and magnesium are helpful for people who struggle with oxalates.

 

Lypo-C can be used for people who struggle with ascorbic acid. Sodium ascorbate is also well tolerated.

 

Just some info for those reading and think they shouldn't take vitamin C! It has been super helpful for me. Along with eliminating coffee.

 

Do you know if decaf coffee has just as much oxalate?

I am undoubtably another victim of acne treatments.   I never took accutane but did use prescription retin A products and was prescribed antibiotics for 4 years for my acne.   Garrett Smith mentioned on a recent video cast that tetracycline inhibits vitamin A metabolism and now you and other saying how it can mess up oxalate in the body too.

What I read recently from oxalate researcher Susan Owens is that certain antibiotics can diminish the strain of gut bacteria that metabolizes oxalate leading to increased sensitivity. I remember doxycycline was on the list but I’m not sure about tetracycline. I’ll try to find the information again.

Coffee is supposed to be fairly low in oxalate from the list I’ve seen published by the same researcher where they had foods analyzed in a lab but that still doesn’t mean you would necessarily tolerate it. I think caffeine in general can be tricky for a multitude of reasons.

@romaine- here’s a quote and I’m retrieving a link to the study the quote is based on. I’ve taken most of them unfortunately.

“On the other hand, all four strains of Oxalobacter formigenes were killed by azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), metronidazole (Flagyl), and gentamicin.”

This is the paper cited.

Sensitivity of Human Strains of Oxalobacter formigenes to Commonly Prescribed Antibiotics” published in Urology, 2012, vol 79, pp. 1286-90 (complete article available for free at http://www.pubmed.gov, PubMed ID #22656407)

Thanks Bella for all the research.   I always suspected that I had long term effects from the antibiotics.  I hated having fairly bad acne and trusted doctors and the "science" at the time but wish I could go back and reverse all that.

I have very bad experiences with classic vitamin C - sodium ascorbate, ascorbic acid, vitamin C is a strong chelator of minerals, especially copper,  ascorbic acid damages ceruloplasmin, minerals and ceruloplasmin are very importatnt for heavy metals chelation and copper metabolism. I did much better with food sourced vitamin C.

"Susan Owens Higher proportions of IV vitamin c convert to oxalate than oral. I got blood clots pretty soon after such an IV that my doctor gave me and I think it was likely from oxalate formed that way because I get that reaction from dietary high oxalate. I had a mother send me retrospectively two OATs done on the same day with a Meyers cocktail given between the two OATS. The oxalate level went up more than forty fold in just a few hours and her son was not well she said for the next month.  "

There is a study in low oxalate group, I can not copy it about vitamin C and oxalate.

Quote from bludicka on May 21, 2019, 10:03 pm

I have very bad experiences with classic vitamin C - sodium ascorbate, ascorbic acid, vitamin C is a strong chelator of minerals, especially copper,  ascorbic acid damages ceruloplasmin, minerals and ceruloplasmin are very importatnt for heavy metals chelation and copper metabolism. I did much better with food sourced vitamin C.

"Susan Owens Higher proportions of IV vitamin c convert to oxalate than oral. I got blood clots pretty soon after such an IV that my doctor gave me and I think it was likely from oxalate formed that way because I get that reaction from dietary high oxalate. I had a mother send me retrospectively two OATs done on the same day with a Meyers cocktail given between the two OATS. The oxalate level went up more than forty fold in just a few hours and her son was not well she said for the next month.  "

There is a study in low oxalate group, I can not copy it about vitamin C and oxalate.

Yeah IV would probably generate much more. Oxalates and vitamin C are very controversial, one side says it's safe, the other says it's not. But either way if someone doesn't feel good taking it then don't.

Yes, IV generate much more but I find it interesting... Many therapies use IV vitamin C infusions... Over the past years I tried every form of vitamin C, ester-c, liposomal, ascorbyl palmitate... I needed a strong antioxidant support due to chelation of heavy metals... the high doses of ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate were for me very harmful - I was copper toxic too and there is a ceruloplasmin very important so that the body can detoxify the "toxic" form of copper. I will never touch ascorbic acid and sodium ascorbate again, only food sourced vitamin C.

Quote from Bella on May 21, 2019, 5:24 pm

@romaine- here’s a quote and I’m retrieving a link to the study the quote is based on. I’ve taken most of them unfortunately.

“On the other hand, all four strains of Oxalobacter formigenes were killed by azithromycin, clarithromycin, clindamycin, tetracycline, doxycycline, ciprofloxacin (Cipro), levofloxacin (Levaquin), metronidazole (Flagyl), and gentamicin.”

This is the paper cited.

Sensitivity of Human Strains of Oxalobacter formigenes to Commonly Prescribed Antibiotics” published in Urology, 2012, vol 79, pp. 1286-90 (complete article available for free at http://www.pubmed.gov, PubMed ID #22656407)

Crap! I am on cipro now. I guess the question now is how to get those oxalobacters back into the gut?